062_G17_InFocus_Tanzania

Global_17

In Focus Tanzania Queen of the taarab Tanzania’s traditional dance, music and art form part of the rituals of daily life – the professional arts scene is small. But one singer has won international acclaim. The late Bi Kidude was popular across Africa and beyond, and known as much for her rebellious nature as for her captivating singing voice A. H. Saleh Tanzania’s culture, in common with most Sub-Saharan African countries, finds expression in language, dance, music, sculpture and ceremonies, but very little of this is conducted in formal institutions such as theatres, art galleries or concert halls. Instead, culture is very much interwoven into the everyday fabric of life and rites of passage – although of course there are the exceptions that prove the rule, for example the fabulous Bi Kidude, the Tingatinga school of painting and the Makonde carvings. However, while these icons stand out like elevated plateaus, the country’s cultural landscape is shaped by a bewildering diversity of influences. Some of these clashed, but most others mingled with the local ethnic cultures to become new, unique She really broke their rules, but at the same time she embodied all the great cultural aspects of that island forms. For example, legend has it that the first people to settle on the islands of Zanzibar (Unguja and Pemba) were Persians from the city of Shiraz who intermarried with locals to form a distinct ‘race’. In 1955, Sir John Gray, former Chief Justice in Zanzibar, wrote: “…for want of a better name, it has become customary to call the era preceding the advent of the Portuguese, the Shirazian era.” This belief was to take political expression as the Afro- Shirazi Party before the independence of the islands in 1963; it opposed the ruling regime (comprising largely Swahilis, Omanis and Indians) and eventually staged a revolution (see article on Tanzanian politics, page 62). The Persian new year, Nawroz, is still celebrated in some areas of the country and before the revolution the largest contingent of Persians in East Africa was concentrated on Zanzibar. Nevertheless, perhaps the most profound cultural influence was Islamic and Arabic, emanating largely from the Omani rulers of Zanzibar who also controlled large chunks along the Tanzanian and Kenyan coasts. This gave rise to the Swahili people with their distinctive language, Kiswahili, composed of Persian, Arabic, Hindi, Portuguese and Bantu words. Later, Christian missionaries, especially in the hinterland, advanced an alternative culture that was sometimes hostile to the predominance of the coast. Exquisite examples of Persian, Indian and Arab architecture can still be seen and enjoyed in Zanzibar’s Stone Town and older parts of the commercial capital, Dar es Salaam. The Bait al Ajaib (House of Wonders), built by perhaps the most dynamic of the Omani monarchs, Seyyid Barghash, dominates the old harbour where dhows from the Gulf still collect during the annual monsoon season. Several buildings from this era are on UNESCO’s world heritage list. Zanzibar, which had become a major Indian Ocean commercial entrepôt during the 19th century, also organised the largest slave-raiding expeditions into the interior until the trade was halted by the British later in the century. This created a cultural schism between the ‘civilised’ Zanzibaris and the people of the interior. Tensions came to a head during the violent revolution in 1964 and continue to surface to this day. However, faced with a mainland in which there were at least 100 different language groups, Tanzania’s first President, Julius Nyerere, promoted the widespread expansion of Kiswahili as a unifying factor. He translated Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar into Kiswahili and academic committees were set up to find Kiswahili equivalents to English expressions, including technical terms. As a result, the best and most grammatically correct Kiswahili in East Africa is spoken and written in Tanzania, although Zanzibar still maintains its reputation as the source of the purest use of the language. The country has produced a clutch of excellent Kiswahili poets and writers, Tanzania through history 900 BCE Southern Nilotes, including the Datoong, move into the area from Sudan and Ethiopia 2000 BCE Southern Cushitic speakers begin arriving in present-day Tanzania from Ethiopia, joining the indigenous Hadza and Sandawe hunter-gatherers 1498 Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama visits Tanganyika AD 500 Eastern Nilotes, including the Maasai, begin arriving from South Sudan 1699 Portuguese ousted from Zanzibar by Omani Arabs 1886 Britain and Germany sign an agreement allowing Germany to set up a sphere of influence over much of Tanganyika, while Britain enjoys a protectorate over Zanzibar 1919 League of Nations gives Britain a mandate over Tanganyika 62 l www.global -br ief ing.org f i rst quar ter 2014 global


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