022_G18_InSight_GlobalSociety

Global_18

Global Insight ICT for Education Technology: the great divider? Technology that can be used for educational purposes is beginning to find its way into schools in developing countries. Good planning will ensure that students get the most from access to these devices Tim Unwin Technology and education have always been closely intertwined. The development of printing transformed and disrupted the traditional medium of education in Europe; the written word similarly replaced oral histories across Africa. It is therefore scarcely surprising that the creation and rapid dissemination of new information and communication technology (ICT) has transformed education throughout the world. However, this is not merely a one-way influence. Education itself shapes and transforms technologies and the way that they are used in our societies. In this ‘modern’ world of instant communication, with almost incomprehensible amounts of data available at the click of a button, it is now very difficult to imagine what education and learning were like a mere 20 years ago. While the 1970s saw the first real introduction of computers into schools, it was not until the end of the 1980s that computers became at all widespread in schools in the richer countries of the world. Subsequently, the development of Microsoft Office packages of software in the 1990s and the use of CD-Roms providing access to multimedia learning resources began to have a more dramatic impact on learning practices. However, even by the early 2000s, the use of ICT in learning across most of the poorer countries in the world was very limited, prompting the launch of initiatives such as the UK Department for International Development’s Imfundo: Partnership for Education in Africa, in 2001, which innovatively sought to integrate the 22 l www.global -br ief ing.org second quar ter 2014 global


Global_18
To see the actual publication please follow the link above