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commonwealth network 70 l www.global -br ief ing.org second quar ter 2014 global The Long View Games without frontiers Do the Commonwealth Games bring long-term benefits to the host city? In return for the cost of putting on the Games, host countries usually hope for economic and social change in the wake of the multi-sport spectacle Sarah Juggins When the starting pistol is fired on 23 July, the eyes of the Commonwealth and beyond will be glued to the sporting action as it unfolds before them. While millions of spectators enjoy the drama on the track and field, away from the athletic action the organising committee of the Glasgow Commonwealth Games will be hoping for success that goes beyond just winning medals. Chief executive of Glasgow 2014, and former wrestling star, David Grevemberg has been involved in organising international multi-sports events since 1994. Grevemberg, who hails from New Orleans, is bubbling with enthusiasm as he talks about Glasgow’s showpiece event. “We are celebrating the Commonwealth through arts, sport and culture. The Games mirror the complexities and gloriousness of the Commonwealth. Glasgow 2014 is moving the event from being a ‘family games’ to being a ‘connected games’.” As someone who first encountered the Commonwealth in 2002, when he worked with the Manchester 2002 Commonwealth Games organising committee on integrating paralympic sports into the athletic programme, Grevemberg is full of praise for the power of the movement. “It forces a conversation about where we have been, where we are now and where we are going. This is what I mean by a ‘connected games’. It is a chance for members of the Commonwealth to share ideas and raise questions – some of them difficult ones.” At a less philosophical level, the CEO says that Glasgow can expect the Games to have a far-reaching impact, some of which is already visible. “Investment in the infrastructure is already making a big difference. Commuting times have been cut from 45 minutes to 15 The promotion of sport in Scotland in the run-up to July’s Games has seen the country’s sports and recreation sector increase its turnover by 15 per cent since 2008


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