076_G19_InFocus_Malta

Global

In Focus Malta Parishes celebrate their patron saints each summer with a feast and a procession, accompanied by a marching band Another, more grotesque ‘spontaneous carnival’ is held at the same time in the Gozitan village of Nadur. As the sun sets, many masked and hooded figures take to the streets to participate in an evening of revelry. Many opt for satirical and often controversial and humorous costumes. During the evenings, the village of Paceville is transformed into a buzzing hub of nightlife that attracts tourists and locals alike to its many clubs, bars and top When it comes to food and wine, the Maltese are distinctly Mediterranean. The Maltese diet mainly consists of the staples bread, fish, pasta, and fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as local wine restaurants to enjoy a meal, then dance the night away. When it comes to food and wine, the Maltese are distinctly Mediterranean. Although many restaurants serving delicious, diverse cuisines can be found around the islands, the Maltese diet mainly consists of the staples bread, fish, pasta, and fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as local wine. Lots of traditional street food is also available from small kiosks, or pastizzeriji, around the island, with the most famous snack being pastizzi: inexpensive pockets of flaky puff pastry filled with ricotta or peas, generally accompanied by Maltese soft drinks or beer. Valletta is set to be the European Capital for Culture in 2018 and Malta has taken a proactive approach to curating its arts and culture, using the run-up to 2018 as a timeframe during which to refine and support its artists. However, Malta’s cultural scene has been steadily growing over the last few decades, with events and activities for everyone from music and performance lovers to visual arts enthusiasts. Each year, the country hosts one of Europe’s most exciting jazz festivals, as well as the Isle of MTV shows and several live music events, concerts and recitals, which take place in various locations around the islands each year. Malta also participates annually in Notte Bianca, an all-night cultural event that sees Valletta’s museums, private and public art galleries, and historical buildings open to the public for free, amid street performances, film screenings and music recitals. Malta’s theatre scene is a thriving one, with a growing number of productions being staged in both English and Maltese each year in various venues, which include St James Cavalier Centre for Creativity, the Mediterranean Conference Centre and the Manoel Theatre – Europe’s third-oldest working theatre, which dates back to 1731. Besides all this, visitors can experience performances of Ghana – traditional Maltese folk music – or purchase crafts made by artisans, such as glassware and lace. With gorgeous scenery, plenty of attractions, and locals known for their warmth and welcoming ways, Malta is a small but radiant jewel in the Mediterranean. Malta-born Davinia Hamilton is a freelance writer and editor currently based in London. Her interests include literature, psychology, travel and food, and she runs her own blog at www.daviniahamilton.com four 76 l www.global -br ief ing.org th quar ter 2014 global © viewingmalta.com 


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