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Global

network chief executive of Scottish Hockey, says the new National Hockey Centre will be commonwealth home to all the national squads and local community clubs, and will also play host to a number of high quality international competitions. The Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome is equally well-prepared to host cycling events at all levels of competition and Glasgow already plans to bid for the right to host major athletics competitions in the future. In addition, the Athletes’ Village, which housed 6,500 athletes and team officials, is set to be transformed into a new housing development, providing 400 affordable homes and a further 300 homes for private sale. The Athletes’ Village – which is in the Dalmarnock area, one of the unhealthiest and most deprived areas in the city – will soon have 700 new residents and its local councillor, George Redmond, says that being able to provide these housing opportunities was “one of my proudest moments as a Glaswegian”. The key factor behind Glasgow’s successful hosting of the Games and the implementation of its legacy has been the buyin from its people. Yes, there were visitors from across the globe who had travelled to the city to watch the Games, but these accounted for just three per cent of ticket sales. The majority of tickets were bought Glasgow also hosted an international hockey competition three months before the Games by sports fans from within the UK and the Susan Fitzpatrick is an academic specialising lion’s share of these were the locals. “I in urban geography and a member of wasn’t that interested to start with,” said Games Monitor, a research group that questions Rob, a city taxi driver, “but I went to the the ambitious aims of Glasgow 2014. opening ceremony with my mate and it was “The shiny new £113 million Sir Chris magic. I tried to get my hands on as many Hoy velodrome might look impressive, but tickets as I could after that.” when you hear people talking what comes Of course it has not been a unanimous across is how they feel ignored,” she said. ringing endorsement for the Games and its “The houses and shops that the residents legacy. Despite the regeneration of Dalmarnock miss might have been poor quality, but they – with a new railway station, a new were the only services they had.” road system and wholesale property development Assessing the impact of the Games this all to the tune of tens of millions of soon after the event has finished is impossible. pounds – some local residents are less than The test will be in the years and decades happy. With regeneration comes upheaval: to come. New Delhi, the host in 2010, Dalmarnock has lost its local shops and has been able to use the Games as a catalyst several tenants have been displaced as old for change and its residents are now tenements have been demolished to make feeling the benefits. Two examples are its way for the new facilities. One 80-year-old transport infrastructure, which received a woman explained that she no longer had much-needed injection of capital, and the any convenience shops within walking distance tourism industry, which has been reported of her home. to have grown by five to ten per cent as a 82 l www.global -br ief ing.org four th quar ter 2014 global direct consequence of the Games, with people from around the world seeing Delhi as a desirable travel destination. The evidence of Glasgow 2014’s legacy will be whether the next generation of Glaswegians are healthier and achieving higher standards of living than their parents, whether employment figures have continued to grow and industries and businesses are thriving. A decade on, will the velodrome have spawned a new generation of cyclists or will there just be a wall of graffiti and some overgrown nettles? For now, Glasgow is basking in the afterglow of a job well done. Grevemberg, who now moves to a new job, says: “If you look back to Manchester 2002, as well as London 2012, you can see the tangible impact of those events in terms of infrastructure and social legacy. Glasgow 2014 took that to heart and wanted a bit of that gold dust too. The city has been charged with that energy. It’s been a wonderful symbiotic relationship that has also galvanised a bright future for the Commonwealth Games.” The Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome is well-prepared to host cycling events at all levels of competition and Glasgow already plans to bid for major athletics competitions Sarah Juggins is a freelance journalist specialising in sports writing, health and fitness: www.sarahjuggins.co.uk The Long View


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