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Global 21 fourth quarter 2015

Arena Development Leaders’ reactions to the new goals “We can rightly celebrate another milestone in multilateralism” Pavel Belobrádek, Deputy Prime Minister for Science, Research and Innovation, Czech Republic “We recognise the urgency to correct our excess, which exacerbated the depletion of the planet” Prince Albert II, Monaco “We cannot be assured of our own peace and security, whilst ignoring how others are living” Hassan Rouhani, President of Iran “We have a new road map, it is universal. No country can shirk its responsibility. But governments’ efforts alone would not be enough. Efforts are needed at all levels, across all sectors and by all stakeholders” Stefan Löfven, Prime Minister of Sweden “Implementing the new agenda would require fundamental changes in the way the private sector did business. We as consumers will also have to make more responsible decisions” Arancha González, Executive Director of the International Trade Centre Production and consumption The emphasis here is on sustainable production and consumption, particularly the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources. There is also a ten-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production for all countries to implement. Other targets include halving food waste by 2030; safer management of chemicals; reducing waste generation; encouraging companies to include sustainability in their reporting practices and promoting sustainable public procurement practices. Inefficient fossil fuel subsidies that encourage wasteful consumption are encouraged to be dropped, and taxation restructured accordingly, taking into account the specific needs and conditions of developing countries. The targets are partly a continuation of the environmental sustainability MDG. Climate change This goal is intended to support the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which is the primary international intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change (see page 12). As such, targets relate to strengthening resilience to climate-related hazards, integrating climate-change measures into national policies, improving education on the effects of climate change and promoting mechanisms for raising capacity for effective climate-change related planning. Implementation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is also mentioned. Sustainable development Marine resources and fisheries are the main focus of the sustainable development goal. Marine pollution is to be reduced significantly by 2025, marine and coastal ecosystems sustainably managed by 2020, ocean acidification addressed and overfishing more effectively regulated. Small island developing states, developing countries and artisanal fishermen are of particular concern and should be enabled to gain maximum economic benefit from sustainably managed oceans. By 2020, subsidies that encourage overfishing should be discontinued, while scientific knowledge is to be increased and utilised. Biodiversity The biodiversity target looks at conservation, the impact of invasive alien species and ending poaching. Desertification is hoped to be combated by 2030, with degraded land restored to health and, by 2020, the extinction of threatened species should be halted. To help fund sustainable forest management “significant resources from all sources and at all levels” should be mobilised. The poaching target does not have a specific end date, but urges states to “take urgent action to end poaching and trafficking of protected species of flora and fauna and address both demand and supply of illegal wildlife products”. Governments are urged to “integrate ecosystem and biodiversity values into national and local planning, development processes, poverty reduction strategies and accounts”. Society The society targets look at violence, exploitation, trafficking, corruption, bribery, the rule of law and arms smuggling. The rule of law should be promoted at national and international levels and countries should ensure equal access to justice for all. Corruption and bribery in all their forms should be substantially reduced, with greater accountability and transparency for institutions at all levels. By 2030 illicit financial and arms flows should be significantly reduced and all forms of organised crime combated. Torture of children is to be tackled, but there is no specific mention of torture of adults. National institutions that prevent violence, and combat terrorism and crime should be strengthened, particularly in developing countries. By 2030, everyone should have legal identity, including birth registration. Global partnership The final goal on global partnership is split into 19 sections, divided into sections on finance, technology, capacity building and systemic issues. The finance section looks at international support for developing countries, including the target of 0.7 per cent of official development assistance/GNI going to the least developed countries, which many developed countries have signed up to. The technology section covers the sharing of knowledge and international co-operation on access to technology, including the dissemination of environmentally sound technologies. The capacity-building category aims to enhance international support for capacity building in developing countries to support national plans to implement the SDGs. It includes trade considerations, including promoting a multilateral trading system under the World Trade Organization. Systemic issues include the collection and monitoring of data, policy implementation and a global partnership for sustainable development. four 32 l www.global -br ief ing.org th quar ter 2015 global


Global 21 fourth quarter 2015
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