Page 6

Global 21 fourth quarter 2015

Inbox News in brief One in three young people not in work or education A quarter of young people globally are unable to find jobs with salaries above US$1.25 a day Young people make up 40 per cent of global unemployment overall, according to a Solutions for Youth Employment (S4YE) report. They are also four times more likely to be unemployed than adults, and unemployment is ten per cent higher for young women than young men. A third of the world’s young people are not in employment, education or training, sometimes referred to as NEET. In some countries, many of the unemployed are highly educated but lack vocational skills. Meanwhile, one in four young people are unable to find jobs with salaries above the global extreme poverty line, or US$1.25 per day. The report cautions that young people’s exclusion from the labour force will contribute to inequality, and warns: “Without a renewed sense of purpose and action from us all, our good intentions outlined in the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will ultimately wither – and a generation will be lost.” S4YE also reports that only 40 per cent of young people expected to enter the job market within the next ten years will be able to obtain jobs that currently exist. To keep employment rates stable, the global economy will need to generate 600 million jobs over the next decade, or about five million jobs per month. S4YE cites the financial crisis and global recession as being among primary causes for youth unemployment. Literary body breaks silence over deaths The Sahitya Akademi, India’s leading literary body, has condemned multiple recent killings of writers, after protesters surrounded its headquarters frustrated by the organisation’s previous silence. Government investigators say that Hindu extremists were responsible for at least two of the murders. Sun-powered school George Mtemahanji is a finalist for the Anzisha Prize, which recognises young entrepreneurs who bring positive change to their communities, for his solar energy venture in rural Tanzania. Mtemahanji, 22, and a friend teamed up with a Swiss organisation to build a solar energy system at an Ifakara school. Venezuela proposes economic zone The Venezuelan President discussed the idea of an economic zone for the Caribbean and Latin America at a recent bilateral meeting in St George’s, Grenada. Both countries want to improve food security and reduce reliance on expensive imports. US ‘witch’ takes ‘warlock’ to court Lori Sforza, who claims to be a witch priestess and runs a witchcraft shop as well as a pagan church in Salem, Massachusetts, USA, is filing for protection against Christian Day, accusing him of harassment. Day, whose website proclaims is the ‘world’s best-known warlock’, is a former business partner of Sforza’s. Indigenous sport The inaugural World Indigenous Games took place in Palmas, Brazil in October. The United Nations-backed event saw athletes from indigenous groups in New Zealand, Australia, Mongolia, Russia, and across North and South America, among others, compete in various sports. Zimbabwe’s poachers turn to cyanide to kill elephants Forty elephants were found dead from cyanide poisoning in Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park in October. The Bhejane Trust and the National Parks and Wildlife Management Authority, which works with the parks agency on animal monitoring and welfare, says that park rangers found the carcasses in two separate locations. Fourteen tusks were recovered from the elephants, according to parks spokeswoman Caroline Washaya Moyo. She says that poachers, who were responsible for the killings, left some of the tusks behind while they were trying to avoid rangers on patrol. These are not the first poisonings. In 2013, as many as 300 Hwange park elephants were poisoned when poachers laced salt pans with cyanide. Environment, Water and Climate Minister Oppah Muchinguri blames the US ban on Zimbabwean elephant sport hunting for the poaching increase. “All this poaching is because of American policies, they are banning sport hunting. An elephant would cost $120,000 in sport hunting but a tourist pays only $10 to view the same elephant,” Muchinguri told Associated Press. Funds from sport hunting, she said, are important for conservation efforts. four 4 l www.global -br ief ing.org th quar ter 2015 global © Matthius G. Ziegler / Shutterstock.com


Global 21 fourth quarter 2015
To see the actual publication please follow the link above