024_Global13_Insight_Forestry

Global 13

Global InsightSustainable Forestry  forestry has long been one of the few areas of the annual interna- With all the obvious benefi ts, why do we not make more use of tional climate change talks on which countries could broadly agree. sustainable forestry? Ian Duff of Greenpeace points to several fac- “REDD+ provides us with one of our best chances to lessen the tors. “Initiatives to protect forests continue to struggle to keep pace effects of climate change in the immediate term, while simulta- with agricultural expansion and its insatiable appetite for land,” neously saving threatened species and bringing social benefi ts to he says. “Poor application of national laws, certifi cation schemes communities in forested nations,” says Chacko. “This was the fi rst and corporate commitments mean that too often forests are being time talks on REDD+ broke down.” cleared in an unsustainable way.” Sustainable forestry is perfectly possible, and is practised in Ecosystem-based adaptation measures, some places with great success. It allows people to exploit forests – for instance, for food and timber – without destroying the biodi- which strengthen green infrastructure, versity or ecology. So the sustainable management of a Brazilian are among the most immediate and cost- nuts, and some trees, but would certainly not allow the selectiverainforest might involve harvesting products such as honey and eff ective means of protecting people from removal of Brazil nut trees, as the illegal loggers do. But the application of sustainable forestry management depends the impacts of climate change on technical know-how, the availability of fi nance, and most of all political will – which is needed to draw up legislation mandating for- The aim had been to move the system from the current rather est protection, enforce those regulations and put in place monitoring piecemeal approach – with many projects around the world but systems to eliminate illegal logging. It seems that, in this case as with little coordination among them – to a more global approach that so many environmental problems, political will is in short supply. would help to scale up the system and make it more effective. Chacko says the scale of the task is daunting for governments. Hopes of doing so have been deferred once more. “We are talking about transformational change here. But trans- Credit: CIFOR/Jan van der Ploeg 24 lwww.global-briefing.org first quarter 2013global


Global 13
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