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Global Issue 15

network Inbox commonwealth 70 l www.global -br ief ing.org thi rd quar ter 2013 global Baby Cambridge has ‘train drivers and miners’ among ancestors Prince George Alexander Louis will be the first British monarch since William the Conqueror to have a non-royal parent. The prince, born to Britain’s Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in London on 22 July, is third in line to the British throne. Genealogist Anthony Adolph, author of The King’s Henchmen, told Global: “Prince George is unique since William the Conqueror in being a future British monarch who has half his ancestry from a mother with completely ordinary ancestry – mainly working and lower middle class. The Prince still has all the royal genes of his royal ancestors, but in addition he has a huge, new input of genes from a vast range of social backgrounds. That is new, and can only be healthy for a monarchy which wishes to be representative of the whole nation.” The Duchess of Cambridge’s ancestors include train drivers, agricultural labourers, and coal miners. However, Adolph has discovered that the Duchess does have a royal bloodline herself. He traced her family tree to discover “a baronet who died in poverty in Chesterle Street workhouse, but who was himself descended from an illegitimate daughter of Edward IV”. Malema launches radical ‘freedom fighters’ party South Africa’s former African National Congress Youth League leader, Julius Malema, is once again in the limelight after launching a new party, The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) in July. Addressing the media at Constitution Hill in Johannesburg, Malema said the expropriation of land without compensation and the nationalisation of the mines, as well as other key sectors of the economy, are central to his organisation’s yet-tobe formed policy. According to the party’s charter, unveiled at the same event, the organisation is a “radical, left, anti-capitalist and anti-imperialist movement with an internationalist Malema: a strong critic outlook anchored by popular grassroots formations and struggles”. Malema, who is just 32, has already had a short but eventful political career. He rose in prominence through the ANC Youth League and played a key role in President Jacob Zuma’s ascent to power in the 2009 election, but was later cast out into the cold after his expulsion from the ANC in 2012 following a bruising battle with Zuma. Malema is now one of Zuma’s strongest Maasai consider trademarking their cultural ‘brand’ The Maasai of Kenya and Tanzania are looking into trademarking their culture to benefit from the lucrative Maasai ‘brand’. With the help of the Maasai Intellectual Property Initiative (MIPI), Maasai elders have started a debate about exploitation of the name by multinationals including Land Rover, Louis Vuitton and Masai Barefoot Technology. Hundreds of thousands of the estimated three million Maasai living in East Africa are already aware of the initiative and its organisers aim to raise this figure significantly over the coming years. For MIPI’s chair, Isaac ole Tialolo, respect for cultural values is just as important as getting a fair cut of the profits. He told the BBC: “I think people need critics, and insists that the EFF stands a good chance of toppling the ANC, which is no idle boast. According to Dr. Somadoda Fikeni, an independent political analyst speaking to News24: “There is a market in South Africa for a radical party like the EFF where people are still asking a lot of questions about transformation.” Analysts say that increasing numbers of South Africans, especially the unemployed youth, are losing faith in the ANC, with a recent survey showing that one in four 18 to 34-yearolds would vote for him. Malema is also facing corruption charges relating to a government tender awarded to a company partly owned by his family trust, but commentators believe that his corruption charges won’t harm his popularity as long as he stays out of jail. According to South Africa’s Mail and Guardian newspaper, Malema has not committed to contesting next year’s elections, stating that the party would decide at the organisation’s national assembly held in July. © Gary van der Merwe to understand the culture of others and respect it.” The bid to protect the Maasai name has drawn worldwide interest and support. Lord Boateng of the UK House of Lords, who co-chairs the African IP Trust, says the balance of power is changing. “Africa is taking charge of its destiny with IP Value Capture. It is a venture about empowerment in the marketplace.” The African IP Trust was set up by Light Years IP to protect the interests of African farmers and producers who export goods to international markets. The Maasai’s cause is outside the usual parameters of the IP protection laws and some advocate a voluntary agreement, such as the one used by Australia’s AboMaasai: respecting cultural values riginal people, as a more effective model.


Global Issue 15
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